Contribution of Bushmeat to household food and income and factors influencing household dependence on Bushmeat in Western Serengeti

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dc.contributor.author Manyama, Flora Felix
dc.date.accessioned 2021-03-20T20:04:15Z
dc.date.available 2021-03-20T20:04:15Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.citation Manyama, F. F. (2020). Contribution of Bushmeat to household food and income and factors influencing household dependence on Bushmeat in Western Serengeti (Doctoral dissertation). The University of Dodoma, Dodoma. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12661/2885
dc.description Doctoral Thesis en_US
dc.description.abstract Bushmeat is an important source of household (HH) food and income in western Serengeti although information on the frequency of consumption and income earned is unknown due to the illegal nature of the activity. This study was intended to determine the contribution of bushmeat to HHs and factors influencing bushmeat dependence. The study was conducted in three villages (Robanda, Rwamkoma and Kowak) selected purposely based on distances from the western boundary of Serengeti National Park (SNP). Data were obtained through HH questionnaire surveys, dietary recall surveys and observations and recording of bushmeat packages conducted in both the dry (September-October 2017) and wet (April-May 2018) seasons. Data on bushmeat consumption frequencies were collected from 127 schoolchildren and compared that to 150 adults from regular HHs selected randomly. Also snowballing was used to locate hunters and bushmeat traders where, 96 respondents were identified. Overall, bushmeat contribute by 15.8% of all meat sources reported but its contribution was more in the closest village (96.3%), declining with distance from SNP (Kruskal-Wallis test; H=454.2; P< 0.001). Bushmeat was consumed more frequently during the dry season (66%) compared to the wet season (34%). Adults on average reported significantly lower bushmeat consumption frequencies than schoolchildren (Wilcoxon test; W=33,526; P=0.003) which imply that children can provide reliable information about the importance of bushmeat in HH consumption than adults. The generalised linear model revealed that, bushmeat consumption in HH was significantly influenced by season, distance and consumption of other meat sources (Table 4.3). The contribution of bushmeat to HH income was significantly higher in the closest village than in the intermediate and distant villages (Kruskal-Wallis test; H=24.025; P<0. 001). HH reliance on bushmeat income was negatively associated with age and gender of the HH head and distance to the protected area (PA) boundary. Hence, efforts to reduce illegal hunting should target male-headed HHs close to PA boundary through promoting alternative meat and income sources. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher The University of Dodoma en_US
dc.subject Bushmeat en_US
dc.subject Household food en_US
dc.subject Household income en_US
dc.subject Illegal nature activity en_US
dc.subject Serengeti en_US
dc.subject Illegal hunting en_US
dc.subject Income sources en_US
dc.title Contribution of Bushmeat to household food and income and factors influencing household dependence on Bushmeat in Western Serengeti en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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